Linda Hunter

Linda Hunter
Assistant Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator
Email: 
lehunter@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
519 824 4120 x54252
Office: 
MCKN 617
Keywords: 

gender and HIV, gender and media representation, motherhood studies, scholarship of teaching and learning.

 
Education: 
PhD Sociology York University (1996)

Dr. Linda Hunter is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, as well as the Department's Undergraduate Coordinator.  Dr. Hunter has published journal articles on the depiction of gender in the media, HIV awareness health campaigns, young mothers, communication and HIV prevention, support needs for HIV positive women and mothers, along with controversial health educational curriculums. She is currently researching teaching methods and the application of interdisciplinary programs such as fine art, to the study of sociology. Dr. Hunter has previously worked with social service agencies in the community and has worked as a gender and media columnist for CBC radio.

Hunter, L. & LaCroix, E. (2017). Understanding HIV Related Stigma Experienced by Mothers: The Next Generation and Implications of the New Ontario Health Education Curriculum. Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement, 8 (1,2), 271-287,  August 2017.

Hunter, L. & LaCroix, E. (2016). Twenty-five Years Later: A Critcial Commentary on HIV Awareness Posters Targeting Women.  Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 25 (2), 169-176,  December 2016.

Hunter, L. & Longhurst, B. (2013). Motherhood and HIV: Stigma, Disclosure, and Educational Opportunities. Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement, 4.1, 168-184.

Hunter, L. & LaMarre, A. (2013). The Use of Community Engaged Learning in the Teaching of the Sociology of Deviance.   New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 15, 23 pages.

Hunter, L. (2009).  Supporting the Mothers: An Exploration of Maternal Health, Well-Being and Support Service Needs for HIV Positive Mothers. Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, 11 (1), 263-278.